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Wolf Kahn: More Vibrant Than Ever

Wolf Kahn has been awarded the 2017 U.S. State Department’s International Medal of Arts. Kahn's work has been part of the State Department's Art in Embassies program, which loans work to diplomatic bureaus around the world. Wolf Kahn received the 2017 U.S. State Department’s International Medal of Arts. Photo by Melany Kahn At age 90, [...]

2017-12-22T10:08:03-05:00 December 21st, 2017|

The Elegant Watercolors of Winslow Homer

Winslow Homer was in his forties when he began to create some of the most beautiful watercolor paintings the world has ever seen. Homer’s mother, Henrietta, was a talented watercolorist who painted nature studies and whose works were the only paintings by another artist he ever collected and hung in his studio in Prouts Neck, Maine.

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 December 8th, 2017|

Orville Bulman and William Glackens: Exceeding Expectations

Orville Bulman The works of Orville Bulman have long been a favorite of collectors. During his lifetime he sold more than 2000 paintings and exhibited in more than forty solo shows. Bulman took some art classes, but was mostly self-taught and the popularity of his paintings surprised even him. When given his first solo show in Palm [...]

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 November 16th, 2017|

Stephen Scott Young: Comfort Food

The works of Stephen Scott Young are like comfort food; they convey a sense of serenity and longing to stay in the moment that he captures in each work of art. In a recent New York Times essay, Dr. Mikkael A. Sekeres, Director of the Leukemia Program at the Cleveland Clinic, fondly recalled the way his journalist [...]

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 October 9th, 2017|

Pablo Picasso Originals: From the Côte d’Azur to Chicago

Picasso continued to create pottery throughout his lifetime. He bought an estate in Mougins, just five miles north of the Madoura pottery, in 1961, where he lived and worked for the remainder of his life. After Jacqueline died, in 1986, the property was abandoned and sat empty for thirty years. It was restored a few years ago and will be auctioned by Christie’s real estate next moth. Bidding will start at 20.2 million euros ($24 million).

2017-09-08T17:05:56-04:00 September 4th, 2017|

Joan Miro: Sensitive to the World

“The artist does not live in bliss.” wrote Joan Miro. “He is sensitive to the world, to the pulsation of his time, to the events which compel him to act. This is bound to happen. This is not an intellectual attitude but a profound feeling, something like a cry of joy which delivers you from anguish.”

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 August 29th, 2017|

Maurice Prendergast: An American Original

Maurice Prendergast was one of America’s most original painters. His works, although labeled Impressionist, have both a European and American sensibility, but are unlike the works of other artists of his time. Maurice Prendergast, 1913 Prendergast was, during much of his lifetime, a painter’s painter. It wasn’t until around the start of World War 1, [...]

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 August 22nd, 2017|

Norman Rockwell: Elusive Originals

“No man with a conscience can just bat out illustrations.” Rockwell wrote, “He’s got to put all of his talent and all of his feelings into them. If illustration is not considered art, then that’s something that we have brought upon ourselves; not considering ourselves as artists. I believe illustrators should say, ‘I’m not just an illustrator. I’m an artist.”

2019-01-13T10:36:58-05:00 August 1st, 2017|

Marc Chagall: Original Works at Surovek Gallery

In spite of being born into poverty in the small village of Liozna, near Vitebsk, part of the Russian Empire, where, as a Jew, his movements were restricted and his options limited, Chagall managed to maintain an optimism that still resonates with people throughout the world.

2021-03-18T17:24:04-04:00 July 25th, 2017|

Neil Welliver: Finding Places of Power

I consider myself an animal part of nature, not a Homo sapien. Like the deer, the bear and the other small whatever else are out there, all the other small things and I feel totally at home there, completely and absolutely at home in the woods.” The backpack that Neil Welliver took with him, when he went [...]

2017-07-21T11:12:24-04:00 July 6th, 2017|

Julio Larraz: Swimming Upstream

Julio Larraz began his career as political cartoonist whose work was published in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune. He has become one of the world’s most important contemporary Latin American painters, with his work in major museums and galleries around the world. Just this year, his work has been included in shows in both Milan and Houston.

2017-07-21T11:12:52-04:00 June 29th, 2017|

Anthony Thieme in St. Augustine’s Lost Colony

Lillian said that her husband Anthony Thieme often insisted that “‘he was born fifty years too late.” He was born in Rotterdam in 1888 and became an American citizen in 1935. “He disliked the rush and roar of the modern age” she said, “… this conflict was always within him, the longing to paint peace and quiet, beauty and harmony, yet confronted daily with the ugliness of modernity.”

2017-07-21T11:13:53-04:00 June 12th, 2017|

Truly American: Tom Wesselmann Prints

Tom Wesselmann spent much of his young adult life searching for his identity, both as an artist and a human being. Born and raised in a middle class family in Cincinnati, Wesselmann knew he wanted to be an artist, but wasn’t sure how to go about fulfilling his aspirations. “I had no point of view.” he said “I hadn’t seen paintings. I hadn’t seen anything. I hadn’t gone to galleries yet or to museums.”

2017-07-21T11:14:47-04:00 June 1st, 2017|

Alexander Calder Originals: Later Works

Alexander Calder turned 71 in 1969. He was still playful, energetic and continued to create fantastic drawings, paintings, prints and sculptures but, like all humans, Calder had to deal with the events that accompany the aging process. He lost two of his closest friends, Marcel Duchamp and Ben Shahn, and was beginning to feel the effects of Parkinson’s Disease. It was Duchamp who named Calder’s original works mobiles and who remained a great friend, until Duchamp’s death, in 1968.

2018-01-12T14:15:56-05:00 May 11th, 2017|

Andrew Wyeth: Still Intriguing After 100 Years

Andrew Wyeth would have been 100 years old in July and probably would have skipped the celebrations and gone out to paint instead. Wyeth died, in 2009, at age 91, at his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. He was buried in Cushing, Maine, the place where he spent his summers and produced many of his greatest works, including Christina’s World .

2017-06-05T11:23:55-04:00 April 27th, 2017|

Mary Cassatt: A Resilient American Artist

Cassatt moved to Paris in 1866, when she was twenty two years old. Her mother, sister Lydia and family friends acted as chaperones. Women were not accepted at the École des Beaux-Arts, so she studied privately and got a permit to copy paintings at the Louvre. Copyists at the Louvre, mostly women, were allowed to copy the works of the great masters but had to leave their work, unsigned, with the museum.

2018-02-28T09:55:56-05:00 April 5th, 2017|

Winslow Homer: Creating Uniquely American Watercolors

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries American artists copied the techniques, and worked in the shadows of, European watercolorists. Watercolors in America were used to make maps, record forays into the country and illustrate texts. Winslow Homer’s watercolor paintings changed all that and influenced many other painters to produce such great works in watercolors that, [...]

2017-11-20T10:05:01-05:00 March 31st, 2017|

George Bellows: Chronicling the World Around Him

George Bellows was not only one of America’s greatest painters and printmakers but also a chronicler of the social changes occurring in New York in the early twentieth century. Encouraged to draw the world around him by Ashcan painter and teacher, Robert Henri, Bellows painted urban landscapes which were often beautiful and, just as often, attacked by [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:55-04:00 March 25th, 2017|

The Power and Passion of Thomas Hart Benton Prints

Looking at America He was larger than life, a brawler and a drinker, but Thomas Hart Benton’s prints, created during the Great Depression, spoke of hope and courage to the millions of Americans who had lost so much. While Benton’s public murals garnered him much acclaim, it was his prints that captured the quiet, melancholy, and sometimes, tragic [...]

2021-03-18T17:24:05-04:00 March 17th, 2017|

Jean-Michel Basquiat

Jean-Michel Basquiat was one of America's brightest, most talented and original artists. His works currently command some of the highest prices at auction around the world. Andy WarholJean-Michel Basquiat, 1982 Early Life and Education Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn on December 22, 1960. Basquiat had two younger sisters. His older brother died shortly before Basquiat [...]

2021-09-16T15:20:24-04:00 January 24th, 2018|

Gifford Beal

Gifford Beal was an American painter, printmaker and muralist, whose early work was associated with the Ashcan School. Early Life and Education Gifford Beal was born in New York in 1879, the youngest of six children. His father, William Reynolds Beal, his oldest brother, Reynolds Beal, and his niece, Marjorie Acker, were all accomplished painters. Beal’s formal [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:58-04:00 June 27th, 2016|

Peter Beard

Peter Hill Beard was an American artist, photographer, diarist, and writer who lived and worked in New York City, Montauk and Kenya. His photographs of Africa, African animals and the journals that often integrated his photographs, have been widely shown and published since the 1960s.

2020-10-14T13:18:23-04:00 October 14th, 2020|

James Carroll Beckwith

James Carroll Beckwith was an American painter whose powerful portraits, murals and paintings of historical monuments are part of permanent museum collections around the world. He signed his work Carroll Beckwith. Early Life and Education James Carroll Beckwith was born in Hannibal, Missouri in 1852, and raised in Chicago, where his father opened a wholesale grocery business. [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:58-04:00 June 29th, 2016|

George Bellows

George Bellows (1882-1925)photograph c.1920 by Nickolas Muray George Bellows turned down an offer to play baseball with the Cincinnati Reds and, instead, became one of the greatest American painters and chroniclers of the twentieth century. Early Life and Career Bellows was born in 1882, in Columbus, Ohio. Bellows mother was 40, and his father 50, [...]

2021-04-27T14:34:24-04:00 June 8th, 2016|

Frank Weston Benson

Frank Weston Benson was one of America's greatest Impressionist painters. He was one of  The Ten who exhibited together in order to advance creativity and originality in American art. Benson was extremely masterful with oils and watercolors and the etchings he did, of wildlife, hunting and fishing, were so in demand that the wildlife and sporting print itself [...]

2016-10-12T12:16:32-04:00 July 1st, 2016|

Thomas Hart Benton

Thomas Hart Benton Painting The Rape of Persephone, 1938 Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975) chronicled the beauty, joys and sorrows of everyday life in America, until the day he died. Early Life Benton was born in 1889 in Neosho, Missouri, the oldest of four children. He spent much of his childhood and adolescence in Washington, D.C., [...]

2021-12-18T17:07:15-05:00 June 8th, 2016|

Oscar Bluemner

Oscar Bluemner was called The Vermillionaire by other artists because of his use of brilliant reds and bold colors. Bluemner was a driving force in the creation of American Modernism. Early Life and Education Oscar Bluemner was born in Prenzlau, Germany in 1876, to a family of artists and artisans. In 1885, Bluemner was given a solo exhibition at [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:58-04:00 July 2nd, 2016|

John George Brown

John George Brown was one of the most popular artists in America at the turn of the twentieth century. His empathetic, and highly skilled, portrayal of children on the streets of New York made him a successful artist, whose works have been exhibited and sought out by collectors for more than a century. Early Life and Education [...]

2016-10-11T12:48:23-04:00 July 5th, 2016|

Charles Burchfield

Charles Burchfield was an American artist, known for his startling, dreamlike watercolor landscapes and lithographs. Early Life and Education Charles Burchfield was born in Ashtabula Harbor in 1893. He was raised in Salem, in Ohio, by his widowed mother. Many of Burchfield’s paintings are of views from the house in Salem, and of the house itself, where [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:57-04:00 July 9th, 2016|

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall painted a world filled with color, light and fantasy and brought an inimitable style of his own to twentieth century art. Early Life and Education Marc Chagall was born Moishe Segal in 1887 in the city of Vitebsk, now part of Belarus. He was the eldest of nine children in a household that was very [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:55-04:00 September 19th, 2016|

Alexander Calder

Early Life Alexander Calder in Stedelijk Museum A'dam. 2 October, 1969 Collectie / Archief : Fotocollectie Anefo Alexander Calder was born in Lawton, Pennsylvania, in 1898, to a family of talented artists. His grandfather, Alexander Milner Calder was a sculptor, who emigrated from Scotland to Philadelphia in 1868. He is best known for his monumental sculpture [...]

2021-05-27T16:41:22-04:00 June 10th, 2016|

Mary Cassatt

Cassatt seated in a chair with an umbrella, 1913, Public Domain Verso reads "The only photograph for which she ever posed. Durand-Ruel - Collection Images of Artists Collection. At a time when women were groomed to marry, stay at home and have children, Mary Cassatt was determined to make a career of painting. Through talent [...]

2021-05-27T16:47:54-04:00 June 10th, 2016|

Elizabeth Catlett

Elizabeth Catlett was born in Washington, D.C. in 1915, the youngest of three children. Her parents were the children of freed slaves. Her mother worked as a truant officer for the D.C. public school system. Her father, who died before she was born, taught math at Tuskegee University and made wood carvings in his spare time. One of his woodcarvings, of a bird, fascinated Catlett, and she aspired to be an artist as early as age six.

2021-08-06T16:53:14-04:00 October 15th, 2019|

Marc Chagall

Marc Chagall | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Marc Chagall painted a world filled with color, light and fantasy and brought an inimitable style of his own to twentieth century art. Early Life and Education Marc Chagall was born Moishe Segal in 1887 in the city of Vitebsk, now part of Belarus. He was the [...]

2018-01-19T09:37:24-05:00 September 13th, 2016|

Charles Caryl Coleman

Charles Caryl Coleman was an American painter, associated with the Aesthetic Movement, who found his muse on the island of Capri. Early Life Charles Caryl Coleman was born in Buffalo, New York in 1840. Coleman studied with noted painter William Holbrook Beard, who lived in Buffalo for a brief time to help create an art community, which [...]

2017-06-05T11:23:57-04:00 July 15th, 2016|

John Steuart Curry

John Steuart Curry was an American Regionalist painter, illustrator, muralist and printmaker. His paintings of rural America were a comfort to many during the Great Depression. Early Life and Education John Stuart Curry was born in 1897 in Dunavant, Kansas, a town whose population was just 85 people in 1910. His parents, Smith and Margaret Curry, were [...]

2017-11-05T13:46:35-05:00 July 26th, 2016|

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