Blog

Norman Rockwell: Elusive Originals

2017-08-04T09:57:19+00:00

“No man with a conscience can just bat out illustrations.” Rockwell wrote, “He’s got to put all of his talent and all of his feelings into them. If illustration is not considered art, then that’s something that we have brought upon ourselves; not considering ourselves as artists. I believe illustrators should say, ‘I’m not just an illustrator. I’m an artist.”

Julio Larraz: Swimming Upstream

2017-07-21T11:12:52+00:00

Julio Larraz began his career as political cartoonist whose work was published in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune. He has become one of the world’s most important contemporary Latin American painters, with his work in major museums and galleries around the world. Just this year, his work has been included in shows in both Milan and Houston.

Anthony Thieme in St. Augustine’s Lost Colony

2017-07-21T11:13:53+00:00

Lillian said that her husband Anthony Thieme often insisted that “‘he was born fifty years too late.” He was born in Rotterdam in 1888 and became an American citizen in 1935. “He disliked the rush and roar of the modern age” she said, “… this conflict was always within him, the longing to paint peace and quiet, beauty and harmony, yet confronted daily with the ugliness of modernity.”

Truly American: Tom Wesselmann Prints

2017-07-21T11:14:47+00:00

Tom Wesselmann spent much of his young adult life searching for his identity, both as an artist and a human being. Born and raised in a middle class family in Cincinnati, Wesselmann knew he wanted to be an artist, but wasn’t sure how to go about fulfilling his aspirations. “I had no point of view.” he said “I hadn’t seen paintings. I hadn’t seen anything. I hadn’t gone to galleries yet or to museums.”

Alexander Calder Originals: Later Works

2017-06-10T16:02:05+00:00

Alexander Calder turned 71 in 1969. He was still playful, energetic and continued to create fantastic drawings, paintings, prints and sculptures but, like all humans, Calder had to deal with the events that accompany the aging process. He lost two of his closest friends, Marcel Duchamp and Ben Shahn, and was beginning to feel the effects of Parkinson’s Disease. It was Duchamp who named Calder’s original works mobiles and who remained a great friend, until Duchamp’s death, in 1968.

Andrew Wyeth: Still Intriguing After 100 Years

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

Andrew Wyeth would have been 100 years old in July and probably would have skipped the celebrations and gone out to paint instead. Wyeth died, in 2009, at age 91, at his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. He was buried in Cushing, Maine, the place where he spent his summers and produced many of his greatest works, including Christina’s World .

Mary Cassatt: A Resilient American Artist

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

Available at Surovek Gallery: Artist: Mary Cassatt (1845-1926) Title: “Children Playing with a Cat” Created: 1908 Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 32 x 39 ½ inches When Mary Cassatt was fifteen years old she studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in Philadelphia. The school didn’t allow female students to draw from live models [...]

Winslow Homer: Creating Uniquely American Watercolors

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries American artists copied the techniques, and worked in the shadows of, European watercolorists. Watercolors in America were used to make maps, record forays into the country and illustrate texts. Winslow Homer’s watercolor paintings changed all that and influenced many other painters to produce such great works in watercolors that, [...]

George Bellows: Chronicling the World Around Him

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

George Bellows was not only one of America’s greatest painters and printmakers but also a chronicler of the social changes occurring in New York in the early twentieth century. Encouraged to draw the world around him by Ashcan painter and teacher, Robert Henri, Bellows painted urban landscapes which were often beautiful and, just as often, attacked by [...]

The Power and Passion of Thomas Hart Benton Prints

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

Looking at America He was larger than life, a brawler and a drinker, but Thomas Hart Benton’s prints, created during the Great Depression, spoke of hope and courage to the millions of Americans who had lost so much. While Benton’s public murals garnered him much acclaim, it was his prints that captured the quiet, melancholy, and sometimes, tragic [...]

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