Asa Shatkin

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So far Asa Shatkin has created 123 blog entries.

Marc Chagall’s Works Set New Record

2018-01-19T09:39:14+00:00

New Auction Highs for Marc Chagall Paintings Two of Marc Chagall's paintings sold for over the estimated price at November's Sotheby's Auction. Le Grand cirque, a ten-foot wide painting, that Chagall did in 1956, was sold to a bidder at Sotheby's Asia for $16 million. The estimate price for Le Grand cirque was $15 million. Marc Chagall Le Grand Cirque, [...]

Wolf Kahn: More Vibrant Than Ever

2017-12-22T10:08:03+00:00

Wolf Kahn has been awarded the 2017 U.S. State Department’s International Medal of Arts. Kahn's work has been part of the State Department's Art in Embassies program, which loans work to diplomatic bureaus around the world. Wolf Kahn received the 2017 U.S. State Department’s International Medal of Arts. Photo by Melany Kahn At age 90, [...]

The Elegant Watercolors of Winslow Homer

2017-12-22T10:00:35+00:00

Winslow Homer was in his forties when he began to create some of the most beautiful watercolor paintings the world has ever seen. Homer’s mother, Henrietta, was a talented watercolorist who painted nature studies and whose works were the only paintings by another artist he ever collected and hung in his studio in Prouts Neck, Maine.

Orville Bulman and William Glackens: Exceeding Expectations

2017-11-20T10:00:50+00:00

Orville Bulman The works of Orville Bulman have long been a favorite of collectors. During his lifetime he sold more than 2000 paintings and exhibited in more than forty solo shows. Bulman took some art classes, but was mostly self-taught and the popularity of his paintings surprised even him. When given his first solo show in Palm [...]

Maurice Prendergast: An American Original

2017-09-08T16:38:23+00:00

Maurice Prendergast was one of America’s most original painters. His works, although labeled Impressionist, have both a European and American sensibility, but are unlike the works of other artists of his time. Maurice Prendergast, 1913 Prendergast was, during much of his lifetime, a painter’s painter. It wasn’t until around the start of World War 1, [...]

Julio Larraz: Swimming Upstream

2017-07-21T11:12:52+00:00

Julio Larraz began his career as political cartoonist whose work was published in the New York Times, the Washington Post and the Chicago Tribune. He has become one of the world’s most important contemporary Latin American painters, with his work in major museums and galleries around the world. Just this year, his work has been included in shows in both Milan and Houston.

Anthony Thieme in St. Augustine’s Lost Colony

2017-07-21T11:13:53+00:00

Lillian said that her husband Anthony Thieme often insisted that “‘he was born fifty years too late.” He was born in Rotterdam in 1888 and became an American citizen in 1935. “He disliked the rush and roar of the modern age” she said, “… this conflict was always within him, the longing to paint peace and quiet, beauty and harmony, yet confronted daily with the ugliness of modernity.”

Truly American: Tom Wesselmann Prints

2017-07-21T11:14:47+00:00

Tom Wesselmann spent much of his young adult life searching for his identity, both as an artist and a human being. Born and raised in a middle class family in Cincinnati, Wesselmann knew he wanted to be an artist, but wasn’t sure how to go about fulfilling his aspirations. “I had no point of view.” he said “I hadn’t seen paintings. I hadn’t seen anything. I hadn’t gone to galleries yet or to museums.”

Alexander Calder Originals: Later Works

2018-01-12T14:15:56+00:00

Alexander Calder turned 71 in 1969. He was still playful, energetic and continued to create fantastic drawings, paintings, prints and sculptures but, like all humans, Calder had to deal with the events that accompany the aging process. He lost two of his closest friends, Marcel Duchamp and Ben Shahn, and was beginning to feel the effects of Parkinson’s Disease. It was Duchamp who named Calder’s original works mobiles and who remained a great friend, until Duchamp’s death, in 1968.

Andrew Wyeth: Still Intriguing After 100 Years

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

Andrew Wyeth would have been 100 years old in July and probably would have skipped the celebrations and gone out to paint instead. Wyeth died, in 2009, at age 91, at his home in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. He was buried in Cushing, Maine, the place where he spent his summers and produced many of his greatest works, including Christina’s World .

Mary Cassatt: A Resilient American Artist

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

Available at Surovek Gallery: Artist: Mary Cassatt (1845-1926) Title: “Children Playing with a Cat” Created: 1908 Medium: Oil on canvas Size: 32 x 39 ½ inches When Mary Cassatt was fifteen years old she studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in Philadelphia. The school didn’t allow female students to draw from live models [...]

Winslow Homer: Creating Uniquely American Watercolors

2017-11-20T10:05:01+00:00

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries American artists copied the techniques, and worked in the shadows of, European watercolorists. Watercolors in America were used to make maps, record forays into the country and illustrate texts. Winslow Homer’s watercolor paintings changed all that and influenced many other painters to produce such great works in watercolors that, [...]

George Bellows: Chronicling the World Around Him

2017-06-05T11:23:55+00:00

George Bellows was not only one of America’s greatest painters and printmakers but also a chronicler of the social changes occurring in New York in the early twentieth century. Encouraged to draw the world around him by Ashcan painter and teacher, Robert Henri, Bellows painted urban landscapes which were often beautiful and, just as often, attacked by [...]

Milton Avery

2017-06-05T11:24:01+00:00

Through the harmonious blending of color and form, the work of Milton Avery appears quiet and serene, yet extremely powerful. In his own reserved way, Avery influenced a generation of painters, including Mark Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb. The Early Years Avery was born in 1885, in Altmar, a small town in upstate New York. His father was [...]

Gifford Beal

2017-06-05T11:23:58+00:00

Gifford Beal was an American painter, printmaker and muralist, whose early work was associated with the Ashcan School. Early Life and Education Gifford Beal was born in New York in 1879, the youngest of six children. His father, William Reynolds Beal, his oldest brother, Reynolds Beal, and his niece, Marjorie Acker, were all accomplished painters. Beal’s formal [...]

James Carroll Beckwith

2017-06-05T11:23:58+00:00

James Carroll Beckwith was an American painter whose powerful portraits, murals and paintings of historical monuments are part of permanent museum collections around the world. He signed his work Carroll Beckwith. Early Life and Education James Carroll Beckwith was born in Hannibal, Missouri in 1852, and raised in Chicago, where his father opened a wholesale grocery business. [...]

George Bellows

2017-11-05T13:08:06+00:00

George Bellows (1882-1925)photograph c.1920 by Nickolas Muray George Bellows turned down an offer to play baseball with the Cincinnati Reds and, instead, became one of the greatest American painters and chroniclers of the twentieth century. Early Life and Career Bellows was born in 1882, in Columbus, Ohio. Bellows mother was 40, and his father [...]

Frank Weston Benson

2016-10-12T12:16:32+00:00

Frank Weston Benson was one of America's greatest Impressionist painters. He was one of  The Ten who exhibited together in order to advance creativity and originality in American art. Benson was extremely masterful with oils and watercolors and the etchings he did, of wildlife, hunting and fishing, were so in demand that the wildlife and sporting print itself [...]

Oscar Bluemner

2017-06-05T11:23:58+00:00

Oscar Bluemner was called The Vermillionaire by other artists because of his use of brilliant reds and bold colors. Bluemner was a driving force in the creation of American Modernism. Early Life and Education Oscar Bluemner was born in Prenzlau, Germany in 1876, to a family of artists and artisans. In 1885, Bluemner was given a solo exhibition at [...]

John George Brown

2016-10-11T12:48:23+00:00

John George Brown was one of the most popular artists in America at the turn of the twentieth century. His empathetic, and highly skilled, portrayal of children on the streets of New York made him a successful artist, whose works have been exhibited and sought out by collectors for more than a century. Early Life and Education [...]

Orville Bulman

2017-06-13T10:08:56+00:00

Orville Bulman was a mostly self taught, mid-twentieth century American artist, whose work was inspired by his trips to Haiti and the American South. His many solo shows were usually sold out before the doors officially opened. Many collectors, including the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, had several of his paintings. Early Life and Family Orville Bulman [...]

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